Release Calendar for January 22, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Gladys T. Black

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch while you do it? Even better! As the world continues shifts to accommodate a wide range of in-home viewing options for movie lovers, it’s not just platforms that are expanding, it’s the very type of films they host. There’s more than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that.

This week’s new releases include streaming originals, fresh VOD offerings, some major awards contenders, festival favorites, and new studio releases now available in the comfort of your own home, plus a variety of exciting virtual cinema picks. Browse your options below.

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Week of January 18 – January 24

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Derek DelGuadio’s In & Of Itself” (directed by Frank Oz)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

Make no mistake: Derek DelGaudio’s remarkable one-man show, which enjoyed a lengthy Off-Broadway run between 2017 and 2018, has ample card tricks, optical illusions, and even one extraordinary teleportation bit. All along, however, DelGaudio transforms the usual shock-and-awe routine into a powerful meditation on existential yearning and his own bumpy quest for meaning in life. By inviting his audience into a meaningful process of self-discovery that stems from his own upbringing, “In & Of Itself” suggests a lyrical alternative to Tony Robbins-style rabble-rousing with an autobiographical twist that grows more sophisticated and awe-inspiring as it moves along. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Human Factor” (directed by Dror Moreh)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Much of the world views the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a fixed problem with no end in sight. Few can explain why, but “The Human Factor” finds those who can. With the white-knuckle intensity of a first-rate political thriller, Israeli filmmaker Dror Moreh’s engrossing documentary tracks glacial efforts to broker a peace deal over the past three decades. “The Human Factor” drills down on the fluctuating tensions between Yasser Arafat and Israel’s revolving door of leadership. By speaking exclusively to the handful of negotiators involved in America’s efforts to broker a deal, Moreh’s focused collection of talking heads and archival footage is limited to a handful of takeaways about what went wrong. It turns out some policy wonks make eloquent storytellers and they excel at putting their own failings in context. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Our Friend” (directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures and Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s “Our Friend,” an honest but insistently scattershot true-life tearjerker adapted from the Esquire article of the same name, starts with its most cogent and powerful scene. Dane — a kind, soft, Totoro of a man played by the always sincere Jason Segel — sits on the porch of a Midwestern home and plays a game with two young girls. Inside the house, their parents use the calculated moment of calm to strategize. Matthew Teague (Casey Affleck) sits alone in the frame, stares into the middle distance, and games out how to tell his daughters that their mother is dying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Preparations to Be Together for an Unknown Period of Time” (directed by Lili Horvát)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

Had Jesse and Celine actually met six months after the events of “Before Sunrise” as planned, had they gone horribly wrong to the point where one of the parties couldn’t even remember the other, and had they both been neurosurgeons, the scenario might look something like “Preparations to Be Together for an Unknown Period of Time.” Such a mouthful of a title, poetic and unwieldy, belies the starkness of Hungarian writer/director Lili Horvát’s haunting and mysterious second feature, a kind of amnesiac love story crossed with the gloomiest of Krzysztof Kieślowski movies, and bordering on existential science fiction. Even if the conceit winds up a little undercooked, and a loopy ending doesn’t quite stick the landing, the filmmaking is exacting and assured, pulling us in like a current into the heart of a most strange romantic mystery. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The White Tiger” (directed by Ramin Bahrani)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Like the upwardly mobile character at its core, “The White Tiger” works best when it moves quickly and doesn’t bother to look in the rear-view mirror. It opens at full speed, with a flash-forward of three attractive twentysomethings bombing down a barren Delhi boulevard in the middle of the night circa 2007. There isn’t a single clogged pore or care in the world between Ashok (Rajkummar Rao) in the passenger seat and his wife Pinky (Priyanka Chopra Jonas) behind the wheel, but wide-eyed Balram Halwai (Adarsh Gourav) sitting in the back is shedding gallons of flop-sweat as he stares at the dark road ahead. For all Balram’s vigilance, he isn’t able to warn Pinky in time for her to avoid braining the poor little girl who darts out in front of the car. Freeze frame, record-scratch, Balram voiceover: “As far back as I remember, I always wanted to be a driver.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Brothers by Blood” (directed by Jérémie Guez)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“Flinch” (directed by Cameron Van Hoy)
Distributor: Ardor Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Ten Minutes to Midnight” (directed by Erik Bloomquist)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“No Man’s Land” (directed by Conor Allyn)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“Personhood: Policing Pregnant Women in America” (directed by Jo Ardinger)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Atlantis” (directed by Valentyn Vasyanovych)
Distributor: Grasshopper Film
Where to Find It: Virtual cinema options through Metrograph Live

Valentyn Vasyanovych earned notoriety as the cinematographer behind 2014’s “The Tribe,” but he finds a confident voice all his own as a director with “Atlantis,” his third feature as such but his most striking to date. Conjuring a bombed-out, postwar Ukraine in 2025, the film’s crumbling world eerily mirrors our own, and is barely distant enough to qualify as speculative fiction. Unfolding across austerely shot (by Vasyanovych himself) tableaux with ruinous production design that brings to mind the industrially fed-on environments of the “Fallout” video games or even Tarkovsky’s “Stalker,” “Atlantis” is a political howl from the soul about a decaying Europe. But its cold, violent exterior turns out to be a bleak disguise for what is an unexpectedly sweet love story at its molten core. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Identifying Features” (directed by Fernanda Veladez)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Virtual cinema options through Kino Marquee

Fernanda Valadez’s feature directorial debut “Identifying Features” takes its seemingly tear-jerking concept one beset by knotty bureaucratic issues, painful language barriers, and the sense of further danger around every bend and turns it into an artfully made and unflinching rumination of life on the margins. Valadez’s story (co-written with the film’s editor Astrid Rondero) could easily have inspired a familiar tale of shattered lives against the backdrop of immigration issues and Mexican cartel violence. Instead, “Identifying Features” eschews the usual tropes. The result is a drama rooted in liminal explorations and unanswerable questions, as confounding as it is satisfying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Notturno” (directed by Franco Rossi)
Distributor: NEON and Super LTD
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

At one lyrical interval in Gianfranco Rosi’s “Notturno,” a fisherman paddles his small boat down a river lit by the rising sun. Something seems off: the sky stays dark too long, and the distant star burns too brightly. Once the discharge of automatic weapons becomes more prominent in the sound mix, however, we realize that such explosive light is no sun at all — and that for the figures given the spotlight in Rosi’s sober and hypnotic portrait of daily life in the war-torn Levant, violence is just another natural, unremarkable part of the landscape. That sequence, mind you, is something of an outlier in this elliptical doc, which the director and cinematographer shot over the course of three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon. Despite the sound of gunfire off in the distance, “Notturno” is less a film about life during wartime than the life that subsequently follows it, as those damaged by the violence try to move forward. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“1982” (directed by Oualid Mouaness)
Distributor: Utopia
Where to Find It: Various virtual cinema options, inlcuding Laemmle

Check out more information about 2020’s newest releases below.

Week of January 11 – January 17

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Acasa, My Home” (directed by Radu Ciorniciuc)
Distributor: Zeitgeist Films, in association with Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options through Kino Marquee

The real stars of “Acasa, My Home,” an immersive look at life in Romania at the border between wilderness and bustling Bucharest, are cinematographers Radu Ciorniciuc and Mircea Topoleanu. Ciorniciuc is also the film’s director, and together they appear to have created such an easy rapport with the land-dwelling family of their focus that they’re able to exist as invisible spectators. And the subjects of the film — a family displaced out of unclaimed land and into city life — display no resistance to being watched. Gica Enache, his wife, Niculina, and their nine children bob and weave around the camera as if it weren’t there, which makes for an unvarnished vérité portrait of lives on the margins, pushed up against the impenetrable glass of a civilized world way out of reach, but suddenly their new reality. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Ham on Rye” (directed by Tyler Taormina)
Distributor: Factory 25
Where to Find It: Streaming on MUBI

A stylish twist on the end-of-high-school dramedy, Tyler Taormina’s “Ham on Rye” offers the ethereal echoes of “The Virgin Suicides” with the gossamer veil of a humid summer’s day slowly lifting, but laced with notes of John Hughes on a steady micro-dose of LSD. That’s to say things are always off-kilter in this movie but the exact nature of whatever is the kink in this coming-of-ager never reveals itself. And while the narrative hardly goes into the fully unhinged direction it teases, it’s pleasantly askew and always marching to its own strange and, slightly off, beat. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Locked Down” (directed by Doug Liman)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

“Locked Down,” the latest and least heightened entry in the emerging (and hopefully short-lived) sub-genre of films shot during COVID-19, opens with a sight that won’t make sense until a bit later: The fattest possible hedgehog bumbling through a London garden like it’s been lapping up cheap wine all day. A few minutes later, Doug Liman’s mostly fun rallying cry for the rush of living counters that odd start with a sight that immediately makes all the sense in the world: Anne Hathaway screaming her way into a movie that was made amid the worst pandemic in more than a century. Some people just have to act, and Hathaway’s effective performance as a frazzled CEO who’s forced to quarantine with her soon-to-be-ex-husband (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is so big and busy that it feels like she’s trying to squeeze in enough acting to sustain her until this whole thing blows over. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Marksman” (directed by Robert Lorenz)
Distributor: Open Road
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Clint Eastwood’s shadow looms large over “The Marksman,” even if you don’t know that this quick and greasy Liam Neeson thriller is directed by “Mystic River” and “Million Dollar Baby” producer Robert Lorenz (“Trouble with the Curve”), or that it shares many of the same craftspeople who worked on those movies. The story of a grizzled old widower who reluctantly finds himself driving an orphaned Mexican boy from Arizona to Illinois with a bag full of drug money on the floor of his truck and a sociopathic cartel assassin in its rear-view mirror, “The Marksman” might be two three-ways short of “The Mule,” but almost everything about it — from its “get off my lawn” misanthropy to its general take on the uselessness of government in American life — feels geared for a late-career Eastwood vehicle. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“MLK/FBI” (directed by Sam Pollard)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“MLK/FBI” reveals shocking behavior by the American government, but the most troubling aspect of its revelations is that nobody had to answer for it. Sam Pollard’s sobering and essential documentary recounts the government’s efforts to blackmail, discredit, and otherwise disempower Martin Luther King, Jr. during the height of the Civil Rights movement, by recording his marital infidelities and wielding them like a blunt weapon. However, the most revealing takeaway from this searing overview isn’t that J. Edgar Hoover used every dirty machination at his disposal to take King down, but that most of the country seemed to think it was the right thing to do. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“One Night in Miami” (directed by Regina King)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Directed by Regina King (already an Oscar and Emmy winner for her acting) and adapted by Kemp Powers (who first launched the project as a stage play), “One Night in Miami” is both a formidable debut for King (who has previously directed a slew of episodes of high-profile television series) and a strong argument for Powers’ medium-crossing skills. It’s also one of the year’s best acting showcases, including turns from Kingsley Ben-Adir as Malcolm X, Leslie Odom Jr. as Sam Cooke, Aldis Hodge as Jim Brown, and Eli Goree as Cassius Clay. The film opens in the lead up to the big fight, introducing each of its four central characters at various points in their lives being, as Cassius will later term it, “young, Black, righteous, famous, unapologetic.” Each of them is facing racism in many forms, from a shocking experience Jim endures at the hands of a seemingly genial neighbor to the white crowds of the famous Copacabana streaming out the moment Sam takes the stage. They are also struggling with the nature of their individual legacies, as Cassius prepares to make a massive change in his personal life, just as Malcolm is planning his own alterations to his. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Outside the Wire” (directed by Mikael Håfström)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Have you ever watched “Training Day” and wondered how cool it would be if, 15 minutes into the movie, Denzel Washington took off his shirt to reveal that he was actually a semi-translucent android super-soldier with the strength of a Terminator and the emotional range of a B-team Avenger? Of course you have — you’re only human. But screenwriters Rowan Athale and Rob Yescombe took it upon themselves to actually make that dream a reality, and the result of their efforts is a high-concept slab of “Netflix movie of the week” sci-fi that wrestles with some big questions about the future of modern warfare via a conceit that borders dangerously close to “Chappie.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Sibyl” (directed by Justine Triet)
Distributor: Music Box Films
Where to Find It: Streaming on MUBI

Sibyl (a jittery Virginie Efira)i s a psychotherapist so driven to write a novel that she drops her clients to buy herself some extra time. She’s barely started to contend with writers’ block (and the distractions brought on by husband and young kids) when a new client finds her way to Sibyl. Young actress Margot (an energized Adele Exarchopoulos, in her most involving turn since “Blue is the Warmest Color”) calls Sibyl in tears over an accidental pregnancy; the father is Igor (Gaspar Uliel), the dashing lead with whom she’s set to star in a new romance directed by revered German auteur Mika (“Toni Erdmann” star Sandra Hüller). And if that wasn’t thorny enough, Mika and Igor used to be an item as well. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Some Kind of Heaven” (directed by Lance Oppenheim)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

More than 130,000 people live in The Villages, the world’s largest retirement community, a central Florida bubble that may as well be heaven on Earth. Lance Oppenheim’s lush and immersive documentary “Some Kind of Heaven” says that outright in its title. But heaven isn’t paradise: Sure, fountains burst forth on palatial grounds filled with golf courses, swimming pools, and music venues. Much of the aging crowd likes to party. Within the boundaries of the four characters at the center of Oppenheim’s debut, however, late-in-life utopia doesn’t come easy. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The White Tiger” (directed by Ramin Bahrani)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on Netflix starting on January 22

Like the upwardly mobile character at its core, “The White Tiger” works best when it moves quickly and doesn’t bother to look in the rear-view mirror. It opens at full speed, with a flash-forward of three attractive twentysomethings bombing down a barren Delhi boulevard in the middle of the night circa 2007. There isn’t a single clogged pore or care in the world between Ashok (Rajkummar Rao) in the passenger seat and his wife Pinky (Priyanka Chopra Jonas) behind the wheel, but wide-eyed Balram Halwai (Adarsh Gourav) sitting in the back is shedding gallons of flop-sweat as he stares at the dark road ahead. For all Balram’s vigilance, he isn’t able to warn Pinky in time for her to avoid braining the poor little girl who darts out in front of the car. Freeze frame, record-scratch, Balram voiceover: “As far back as I remember, I always wanted to be a driver.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Buck Run” (directed by Nick Frangione)
Distributor: Freestyle Digital Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“The Delivered” (directed by Thomas Clay)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets” (directed by Yaniv Raz)
Distributor: Kreate Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Don’t Tell a Soul” (directed by Alex McAulay)
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“Love Sarah” (directed by Eliza Schroeder)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Skyfire” (directed by Simon West)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“The Wake of Light” (directed by Renji Philip)
Distributor: Axis Pacific Filmworks
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options through Laemmle Virtual Cinema

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“My Little Sister” (directed by Stéphanie Chuat and Véronique Reymond)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

Sven (Lars Eidinger) is already sick by the time his beloved, if slightly estranged twin sister Lisa (Nina Hoss) comes to take him home. An audacious actor hellbent on getting back to the stage after his leukemia diagnosis, Sven initially scans as the most formidable character in Stéphanie Chuat and Véronique Reymond’s moving drama “My Little Sister,” but it’s Lisa who emerges as its fiery heart. Hoss and Eidinger easily slip into the twins’ close bond, with the actors adopting similar mannerisms and inflections, all the better to sell the sense that even the distance that has marked their adulthood is unable to crack what was forged in the womb. But can terminal illness? The answer is no, obviously, but Chuat and Reymond take their time unspooling a graceful drama that twists the tear-soaked conventions of the cancer drama into something raw and satisfying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Film About a Father Who” (directed by Lynne Sachs)
Distributor: Cinema Guild
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

“Rock Camp, The Movie” (directed by Doug Blush)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of January 4 – January 10

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Fatale” (directed by Deon Taylor)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It: Various PVOD platforms

For better (and worse, so, so much worse) Deon Taylor attempts to subvert the pattern with his baffling “Fatale,” an erotic thriller that’s convoluted, boring, and maybe worst of all, hideously unsexy. No one comes out happy, especially the audience. Taylor, who reteams with his “The Intruder” star Michael Ealy and screenwriter David Loughrey (who also wrote “Obsessed”!), takes some swings that have to be admired, because the basic ideas are quite good, even as the execution is very bad. What if, instead of a thriller in which a “good guy” attempts to earn back his life after a terrible mistake, we start with a “good guy” whose life is maybe not worth getting back? Where could that go? In “Fatale,” that premise serves a tortuously plotted story that, despite all manner of misdirections, also manages to be incredibly obvious. You’ll think you’ll know where it’s going, but then you won’t, but then you might, and it also doesn’t really matter, because it’s all bad. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Herself” (directed by Phyllida Lloyd)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Co-written by star Clare Dunne alongside “What Richard Did” screenwriter and frequent TV scribe Malcolm Campbell, “Herself” traces Sandra’s journey from doting mother and abused wife to emancipated woman, thanks to her own ability to dream big in the face of overwhelming obstacles. While Dunne and Campbell’s script attempts to tackle a number of timely issues — from economic anxiety and housing scarcity, in addition to domestic abuse — “Herself” also keenly observes how all those problems can impair good, caring people from being able to help others. Sandra’s big plan to literally build her own house from scratch is steeped in her own sense of self-determination, but it’s a wild idea without the help of others. But how can she rally her friends and neighbors when they are suffering their own troubles? It’s a heartbreaking idea, but “Herself” — much like its believably plucky heroine — doesn’t allow itself to wallow in the drama, and despite the film’s heart-wrenching storyline, things never get unbearably dark. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“One Night in Miami” (directed by Regina King)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters (streaming on Amazon on January 15)

Directed by Regina King (already an Oscar and Emmy winner for her acting) and adapted by Kemp Powers (who first launched the project as a stage play), “One Night in Miami” is both a formidable debut for King (who has previously directed a slew of episodes of high-profile television series) and a strong argument for Powers’ medium-crossing skills. It’s also one of the year’s best acting showcases, including turns from Kingsley Ben-Adir as Malcolm X, Leslie Odom Jr. as Sam Cooke, Aldis Hodge as Jim Brown, and Eli Goree as Cassius Clay. The film opens in the lead up to the big fight, introducing each of its four central characters at various points in their lives being, as Cassius will later term it, “young, Black, righteous, famous, unapologetic.” Each of them is facing racism in many forms, from a shocking experience Jim endures at the hands of a seemingly genial neighbor to the white crowds of the famous Copacabana streaming out the moment Sam takes the stage. They are also struggling with the nature of their individual legacies, as Cassius prepares to make a massive change in his personal life, just as Malcolm is planning his own alterations to his. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Pieces of a Woman” (directed by Kornél Mundruczó)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

KornélMundruczó’s virtuosic movies tend to open like a house on fire only to spend the last two acts finger-painting with the ashes (see: “White God,” “Jupiter’s Moon”) and “Pieces of a Woman” is no exception. On the contrary, this film’s harrowing prologue is the most audacious thing its director has ever shot: A 30-minute long-take that follows an ill-fated home birth in real time as Mundruczó’s camera wends through a Boston townhouse on a gimbal, supplanting the chaos of a handheld camera with a harrowing sense of awe and holy terror. Things seem off from the start, even if birth plans were made to be broken. It’s bad enough that Martha (Vanessa Kirby) feels sick — loopy, confused, gulping back vomit that never comes — and even worse that the scheduled midwife is busy with another labor. Her replacement is a woman named Eve (“Madeline’s Madeline” actress Molly Parker, threading the needle between fierce conviction and false confidence as only she can), and we can’t help but distrust her or feel like she’s in over her head. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Average Joe” (directed by Mark Cantu)
Distributor: Indican Pictures
Where to Find It: DVD, plus various Digital HD platforms, including Apple TV, Google Play, Amazon Prime Video, and FandangoNOW

“It Not Now, When?” (directed by Meagan Good and Tamara Bass)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Zombie Bro” (directed by May Grehan)
Distributor: Indican Pictures
Where to Find It: Various Digital HD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“The Reason I Jump” (directed by Jerry Rothwell)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

Higashida Naoki didn’t intend for his story to be representative of the entire spectrum, or even reflect the experience of anyone else, but he hoped that explaining what goes on in his own mind would help to forge a compassionate new understanding between the neurotypical and neurodivergent communities. If Jerry Rothwell’s film version of “The Reason I Jump” is far more effective and self-possessed than most documentary adaptations of “memoirs” tend to be, that’s largely because it sees Higashida’s book as a lens instead of as a subject, and refracts various other people through it in recognition of the rare tale that’s less important than how it’s translated. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Beautiful Something Left Behind” (directed by Katrine Philp)
Distributor: MTV Documentary Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

“Blizzard of Souls” (directed by Dzintars Dreibergs)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

Check out more information about 2020’s newest releases on the next page.

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